Let’s read an article a month – May 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one falls under the infection and lung function categories. The objective of this paper is to “ [assess] patient-reported dyspnoea, lung function, quality of life (QoL) and parenchymal opacities in chest CT scans 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19 in a prospective, consecutive Norwegian cohort of patients with or without ICU treatment. ” [p2]. 


Dyspnoea, lung function and CT findings 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19

By: Tøri Vigeland Lerum, Trond Mogens Aaløkken, Eivind Brønstad, Bernt Aarli, Eirik Ikdahl , Kristine Marie Aarberg Lund , Michael T. Durheim, Jezabel Rivero Rodriguez , Carin Meltzer , Kristian Tonby, Knut Stavem, Ole Henning Skjønsberg, Haseem Ashraf and Gunnar Einvik. 

Eur Respir J 2021; 57: 2003448

Link to the pdf/article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/57/4/2003448.full.pdf


Why this article caught my attention:

  • It helped me have a better understanding of the recovery process of individuals with COVID19.  There will be a lot of focus on the recovery and rehab of patients once we are done with the peak of this pandemic.  
  • Includes valuable information as it focuses on symptoms and various diagnostic data which includes PFT and CT scans! Check out page 3 and also Table 2 on page 5 for more information

I really hope that more studies like this will be conducted on our COVID19 patients.

How are you preparing for COVID19 Rehab? Which set of data and recommendations are you using?

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

May 31st, 2021

Let’s read an article a month – April 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one is about chronic bronchitis. The objective of this paper is to “assess the prevalence of chronic bronchitis in young adults in a Swedish population-based birth cohort and to identify early-life risk factors, including environmental exposures, for disease development” (p2). 


Assessment of chronic bronchitis and risk factors in young adults: results from BAMSE

By: Gang Wang, Jenny Hallberg, Petra Um Bergström, Christer Janson, Göran Pershagen, Olena Gruzieva, Marianne van Hage, Antonios Georgelis, Anna Bergström, Inger Kull, Anders Lindén, and Erik Melén. 

European Respiratory Journal (ERJ) 2021 57: 2002120 ; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.02120-2020

Link to the ERJ page: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/57/3/2002120?etoc

Link to the pdf page: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/57/3/2002120.full.pdf


3 Reasons why I found this article interesting

  • Authors comment on the impact of cigarette and e-cigarettes and chronic bronchitis in young adults (direct and indirect). Also, authors included factors such as breastfeeding as a protective factor which is something I would not have immediately thought of.
  • It includes a 24-year follow up assessment. They have excluded asthmatic patients to make their observation more accurate.  Various assessment tools were included, including self-assessments, pre and post spirometry, and FeNO2. 
  • This study reminded me that this condition “may exist with our without airway obstruction” p7.

What’s your experience with chronic bronchitis in young adults? Have you noticed a pattern?

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi
April 16, 2021

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-April-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – March 2021


The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This article is about COPD and COPD exacerbation. The authors describe the objectives of this paper as following: 

 The first objective of this study was to evaluate whether the data from the ECLIPSE and SPIROMICS studies support the presence of an individual-specific, underlying AECOPD rate which is stable over time. The second objective was to explore, based on the findings from the first objective, the randomness of observed AECOPD counts in a 12-month period, in order to determine the suitability of this factor for phenotypic classification.

p2

Should the number of acute exacerbations in the previous year be used to guide treatments in COPD?

By: Mohsen Sadatsafavi, James McCormack, John Petkau, Larry D. Lynd, Tae Yoon Lee, Don D. Sin

European Respiratory Journal (ERJ) 2021 57: 2002122; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.02122-2020

Link to the journal ERJ: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/57/2/2002122?etoc

Direct link to the article (pdf):  https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/57/2/2002122.full.pdf


Reasons I enjoyed reading this article

  • It makes you appreciate the complexity involved in predicting future COPD exacerbation.  It is not as simple as looking at a patient’s number of exacerbations in the previous year.
  • The ECLIPSE and SPIROMICS studies are looked at and comments are made about the “difference” in findings.  
  • It is always nice to see the work of Canadian clinicians and researchers! 

Read the article and let me know what you think!  What are the factors used by your organization to predict and prevent future COPD exacerbations? 

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

March 28, 20201 

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-march-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – January 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the tittle and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.


This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one falls under asthma and biologic treatments. The objective of this paper is to “ [describe] the effects of alarmins and [discuss] the potential role of anti-alarmins in the context of existing biologics “ (p1 ).

Anti-alarmins in asthma: targeting the airway epithelium with next-generation biologics

By: C. M. Porsbjerg, A. Sverrild, C. M. Lloyd, A. N. Menzies-Gow and E. H. Bel 

European Respiratory Journal 2020 56: 2000260; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00260-2020

Link to the article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/56/5/2000260


Reasons you may find this article interesting 

  • Great review of inflammatory pathways in asthma (beginning on page 2).
  • An in-depth discussion of targeting the alarmins using biological therapies (beginning on page 6).  
  • Useful visualization to help put things in perspective ( Figure 1 on page 3 and Figure 2 on page 7). 

While I recommend you check out this article, I need to give you a heads-up. If you are not as familiar with asthma inflammatory pathways, you may need to dedicate more time to this piece.  Personally, I had to come back to it a few times.

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

January 1st, 2021

Link to the blog post: https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-january-2021

Let’s read an article a month –December 2020

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the tittle and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

Link to the article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029208/

Link to the blog post: https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-december-2020/

This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one is a case study. The authors of this paper have tried to “report a case of a middle-aged lady who was initially misdiagnosed as having acute asthma after brief tracheal intubation” (p.1). 

Tracheal stenosis mimicking severe acute asthma

Ali Bin Sarwar Zubairi, Babar Dildar, Shahid Javed Husain and Mohammad Faisal Khan

BMJ Case Rep. 2010; 2010: bcr1220092517.

Link to the article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029208/pdf/bcr.12.2009.2517.pdf

Reasons you may find this article interesting 

  • Tracheal stenosis post intubation is rare but it can happen.  To make the case even rarer, this lady was intubated for less than 48 hours. 
  • This article includes images that are interesting to view.  Two are from the bronchoscopy view of the narrowing (Figures 1 and 2. on pages 2 and 3).  The other image is a CT scan of the neck which shows the tracheal stenosis (Figure 3 page 4).  I greatly enjoyed seeing the visual aspect of this case!
  • I enjoyed reading the differential diagnosis from her ER visit:
    “New-onset severe asthma, bilateral vocal-cord paralysis, foreign-body aspiration, tracheal tumours, post-intubation/tracheostomy tracheal stricture, Wegener’s granulomatosis, obstruction of trachea or mainstem bronchi due to external compression from mediastinal tumours or adenopathy” (p.2).

I encourage you to read this interesting and short case study as the authors also review the potential reasons why this stenosis occurred and also the potential treatment options.

If you enjoyed this article, consider liking this blog post and sharing it with others who may benefit from it.

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

December 1st, 2020https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-december-2020/


Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi
December 1st, 2020
https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-december-2020/