Let’s read an article a month – June 2022

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I read an open-access article. I share the title and associated link with my followers to encourage clinicians to read more articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

The objective of this month’s paper is “to compare the impact of wearing different masks during a 6MWT on respiratory symptoms, SpO2, and functional capacity” (p86).


Effects of wearing different facial masks on respiratory symptoms, oxygen saturation, and functional capacity during six-minute walk test in healthy subjects

By Sauwaluk Dacha, Busaba Chuatrakoon, Kanphajee Sornkaew, Kamonchanok Sutthakhun, Putsamon Weeranorapanich, Vanesa Bellou, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Maarten van Smeden, Karel G.M. Moons, Evangelos Evangelou and Lazaros Belbasis

Can J Respir Ther Vol 58

Link to the article: https://www.cjrt.ca/wp-content/uploads/cjrt-2022-014.pdf


Wearing different masks while performing submaximal functional activities results in no difference in oxygen saturation and functional exercise performance. However, wearing cloth masks and N95 masks results in increased dyspnea and breathing effort.

p89

It is important to note that this is a small study of 29 young and healthy subjects who did not have any cardiopulmonary disease or limitations (p86).

Happy reading and learning,

Farzad Refahi

June 27, 2022

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-june-2022/

Let’s read an article a month – May 2022

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I read an open-access article. I share the title and associated link with my followers to encourage clinicians to read more articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

The objective of this month’s paper is to “to conduct a nationwide cohort study of the effect of exposure to immunosuppressants on the risk of hospital admission, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death among all SARS-CoV-2 test-positive patients in Denmark from February 2020 to October 2020” (p2).


The effect of immunosuppressants on the prognosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection

By: Daniel Ward, Sanne Gørtz, Martin Thomson Ernst, Nynne Nyboe Andersen, Susanne K. Kjær, Jesper Hallas, Steffen Christensen, Christian Fynbo Christiansen, Simone Bastrup Israelsen, Thomas Benfield, Anton Pottegård, and Tine Jess.

European Respiratory Journal 2022 59: 2100769; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00769-2021

Link to the article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/59/4/2100769.full.pdf


Just a few quotes from the article to get you thinking and started:

“A composite immunosuppressant exposure was associated with a significantly increased risk of death, which was mainly driven by a doubling of risk associated with systemic glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids were also associated with a 34% increased risk of hospital admission, while the risk of ICU admission was not significantly increased”.

Page 6

 “Glucocorticoids were associated with increased risk of ICU admission or death in patients with comorbid inflammatory bowel diseases; glucocorticoids were associated with greater risk of hospital admission in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases”.

Page 6

“While other pharmacological interventions remain relevant research candidates, evidence from multiple sources indicates the importance of glucocorticoids on prognosis, the effect of which may depend on timing in the disease course. Our findings that other immunosuppressants were not significantly associated with severe outcomes are tentative, but in context they support the continued use of steroid-sparing immunosuppressants for a broad patient population with ongoing healthcare needs during the pandemic.” (pp 7-8).

Pages 7 to 8

Happy reading and learning,

Farzad Refahi

March 27, 2022

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-may-2022/

Let’s read an article a month – October 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

The objective of this paper is to “evaluate respiratory function 4 months after diagnosis in patients who survive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and the difference between patients with or without initial lung involvement” (p1).


Medium-term impact of COVID-19 on pulmonary function, functional capacity and quality of life

By: Fabio Anastasio, Sarah Barbuto, Elisa Scarnecchia, Paolo Cosma, Alessandro Fugagnoli, Giulio Rossi, Mirco Parravicini, and Pierpaolo Parravicini.

European Respiratory Journal 2021 58: 2004015; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.04015-2020

Link to the article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/58/3/2004015?etoc


Reasons I liked this article

  • The age range for this study was 18 to 80 years old (p2).  Also, a detailed assessment was attained from the subjects, of course post infection, which included SF-12 and IPAQ questionnaires, 6MWT,  and a comprehensive PFT (p2).
  • This study shows “a reduction of respiratory function and exercise capacity secondary to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, mostly in patients who developed ARDS during the acute phase” (p9). 
  • The authors suggest that the data may indicate that “respiratory evaluation does not appear to be necessary in patients without pneumonia and without symptoms. DLCO, 6MWT and plethysmography could be avoided in patients without pneumonia, performing only spirometry with bronchodilator responsiveness testing…In contrast, in patients who developed ARDS, DLCO, 6MWT and complete spirometry could uncover presence of residual pulmonary and functional impairment, with need for respiratory rehabilitation and gradual physical activity “ (p10). 

As always, take the time to read this study. There is a lot of information and data covered in the study which I cannot cover here.  As a disclaimer, continue to follow guidelines for ordering PFTs and providing patient care as recommended by your employer and regulatory body.

Happy reading and learning,

Farzad Refahi

October 6th, 2021

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-october-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – September 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a piece on cardiopulmonary exercise capacity and COVID19 recovery. The objective of this paper is to “determine cardiopulmonary function during exercise 3–4 months after hospital discharge for COVID-19 compared with a reference population and to describe the characteristics of participants with exercise limitations. ” p2.


Cardiopulmonary exercise capacity and limitations 3 months after COVID-19 hospitalisation

By: Ingunn Skjørten, Odd Andre Wathne Ankerstjerne, Divna Trebinjac, Eivind Brønstad, Øystein Rasch-Halvorsen, Gunnar Einvik, Tøri Vigeland Lerum, Knut Stavem, Anne Edvardsen, and Charlotte Björk Ingul

European Respiratory Journal 2021 58: 2100996; DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00996-2021

Link to the article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/58/2/2100996?etoc


The reasons I found this article interesting 

  • Regaining exercise capacity after COVID-19 is an important finding (p7).
  • Brings more weight to self-reported dyspnea as it was “associated with lower ventilatory efficiency and lower V′O2peak·kg−1 due to higher BMI” (p7).
  • In order of relevance: deconditioning, circulatory factors, and ventilatory limitation were the top three exercise limitations (p7).

This is a great article so I encourage you to take the time to read it.  

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

September 30, 2021

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-september-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – May 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one falls under the infection and lung function categories. The objective of this paper is to “ [assess] patient-reported dyspnoea, lung function, quality of life (QoL) and parenchymal opacities in chest CT scans 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19 in a prospective, consecutive Norwegian cohort of patients with or without ICU treatment. ” [p2]. 


Dyspnoea, lung function and CT findings 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19

By: Tøri Vigeland Lerum, Trond Mogens Aaløkken, Eivind Brønstad, Bernt Aarli, Eirik Ikdahl , Kristine Marie Aarberg Lund , Michael T. Durheim, Jezabel Rivero Rodriguez , Carin Meltzer , Kristian Tonby, Knut Stavem, Ole Henning Skjønsberg, Haseem Ashraf and Gunnar Einvik. 

Eur Respir J 2021; 57: 2003448

Link to the pdf/article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/57/4/2003448.full.pdf


Why this article caught my attention:

  • It helped me have a better understanding of the recovery process of individuals with COVID19.  There will be a lot of focus on the recovery and rehab of patients once we are done with the peak of this pandemic.  
  • Includes valuable information as it focuses on symptoms and various diagnostic data which includes PFT and CT scans! Check out page 3 and also Table 2 on page 5 for more information

I really hope that more studies like this will be conducted on our COVID19 patients.

How are you preparing for COVID19 Rehab? Which set of data and recommendations are you using?

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

May 31st, 2021