Let’s read an article a month – August 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

The objective of this paper is to use the “data from the INMARK trial to assess the feasibility and validity of home spirometry as a measure of lung function decline in subjects with IPF “ p2.


Home spirometry in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: data from the INMARK trial

By: Imre Noth, Vincent Cottin, Nazia Chaudhuri, Tamera J. Corte, Kerri A. Johannson, Marlies Wijsenbeek, Stephane Jouneau, Andreas Michael, Manuel Quaresma, Klaus B. Rohr, Anne-Marie Russell, Susanne Stowasser and Toby M. Maher

Eur Respir J 2021 58:2001518; published ahead of print 2021,

doi:10.1183/13993003.01518-2020 OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE

Link to the article: http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/58/1/2001518?etoc


Reasons you may find this article interesting 

  • I like the idea of patients with chronic conditions being able to perform spirometry at home.  I value the time and technology advancement to make these tests available at home, and having the ability to remotely tracking patients’ progress. This empowers patients to be more aware of their health status and to be more conscious of their well being.
  • Authors conclude that there is a “strong correlation where observed between FVC measurements abstain at home and in clinic at individual time-points, but correlations between changes in FVC measurements over time estimated using home and clinic spirometry were weak, mainly due to variability in the measurements obtained using home spirometry” p8. (side note: researchers did provide re-training as required). I encourage you to read the full article to view all the details.

Happy reading and learning!

Farzad Refahi

August 25, 2021
https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-august-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – July 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a narrative review to share with you.  The objective of this paper is to “  to review detached opinions and provide strategies for the safe and effective delivery of aerosolized medications through HFNC in the era of COVID-19 and beyond.” [p22].


How to deliver aerosolized medications through high flow nasal cannula safely and effectively in the era of COVID-19 and beyond: A narrative review

By: Arzu Ari, PhD, RRT, PT, CPFT, FAARC, FCCP, Gerald B. Moody, BSRC, RRT-NPS

Can J Respir Ther 2021;57:22–25. doi: 10.29390/cjrt-2020-041.

Link to the article: https://www.cjrt.ca/wp-content/uploads/cjrt-2020-041.pdf


The reason you may enjoy this article

  • The authors have put together a nice summary of suggestions with regards to:
    •  Nebulizer selection, 
    • Nebulizer placement and use, 
    • HFNC cannula prongs, 
    • Gas flow, 
    • Delivery technique, and 
    • Unit dose vs. continuous nebulization with an infusion pump.

      Checkout Table 1 on page 24.

Happy reading and learning,

Farzad Refahi

July 27, 2021
https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-july-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – June 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month’s article falls under infection and lung function. The objective of this paper is to “systematically evaluating the persisting cardiopulmonary damage of COVID-19 patients 60 days and 100 days after COVID-19 onset” (p2).


Cardiopulmonary recovery after COVID-19: an observational prospective

  multicentre trial

By:  Thomas Sonnweber, Sabina Sahanic, Alex Pizzini, Anna Luger, Christoph

  Schwabl, Bettina Sonnweber, Katharina Kurz, Sabine Koppelstätter, David

  Haschka, Verena Petzer, Anna Boehm, Magdalena Aichner, Piotr Tymoszuk,

  Daniela Lener, Markus Theurl, Almut Lorsbach-Köhler, Amra Tancevski, Anna

  Schapfl, Marc Schaber, Richard Hilbe, Manfred Nairz, Bernhard Puchner,

  Doris Hüttenberger, Christoph Tschurtschenthaler, Malte Aßhoff, Andreas

  Peer, Frank Hartig, Romuald Bellmann, Michael Joannidis, Can

  Gollmann-Tepeköylü, Johannes Holfeld, Gudrun Feuchtner, Alexander Egger,

  Gregor Hoermann, Andrea Schroll, Gernot Fritsche, Sophie Wildner, Rosa

  Bellmann-Weiler, Rudolf Kirchmair, Raimund Helbok, Helmut Prosch, Dietmar

  Rieder, Zlatko Trajanoski, Florian Kronenberg, Ewald Wöll, Günter Weiss,

  Gerlig Widmann, Judith Löffler-Ragg and Ivan Tancevski.

  Eur Respir J 2021 57:2003481; published ahead of print 2020,

  doi:10.1183/13993003.03481-2020 OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE

Link to the ERS article page  http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/57/4/2003481?etoc


Reasons you may find this article interesting 

  • I have noticed a trend of increased referrals for patients with past diagnoses of COVID19.  As the local rates for the virus decreases, patients and ordering physicians have felt more confident sending patient to the outpatient PFT lab of the hospital.  This is another useful article to better plan and look after such patients. 
  • While this study has its limitations such as 
    • being specific to Austria, 
    • includes individuals with existing comorbidities, and 
    • lacks pre-infection diagnostic testing, 

      However, it still delivers a lot of useful information.  The study includes questionnaires, PFT, cap. Gas samples, TEE, CT and other routine lab examinations (p3).  I strongly recommend that you look over each component in the results section: Clinical Evaluation at follow-up, Cardiopulmonary evaluation at follow-up, Serological Markers, and Pulmonary Imaging (pp 4-6).

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

https://respiratory.blog/lets-read-an-article-a-month-june-2021/

Let’s read an article a month – May 2021

The cropped screenshot of the first page of the article. It also includes the URL or link to the article.

Every month I try to read an open-access article. After reading the article, I share the title and associated link with my followers. This is to encourage clinicians to read articles, stay up to date, and continue to grow.

This month I found a great piece to share with you.  This one falls under the infection and lung function categories. The objective of this paper is to “ [assess] patient-reported dyspnoea, lung function, quality of life (QoL) and parenchymal opacities in chest CT scans 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19 in a prospective, consecutive Norwegian cohort of patients with or without ICU treatment. ” [p2]. 


Dyspnoea, lung function and CT findings 3 months after hospital admission for COVID-19

By: Tøri Vigeland Lerum, Trond Mogens Aaløkken, Eivind Brønstad, Bernt Aarli, Eirik Ikdahl , Kristine Marie Aarberg Lund , Michael T. Durheim, Jezabel Rivero Rodriguez , Carin Meltzer , Kristian Tonby, Knut Stavem, Ole Henning Skjønsberg, Haseem Ashraf and Gunnar Einvik. 

Eur Respir J 2021; 57: 2003448

Link to the pdf/article: https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/erj/57/4/2003448.full.pdf


Why this article caught my attention:

  • It helped me have a better understanding of the recovery process of individuals with COVID19.  There will be a lot of focus on the recovery and rehab of patients once we are done with the peak of this pandemic.  
  • Includes valuable information as it focuses on symptoms and various diagnostic data which includes PFT and CT scans! Check out page 3 and also Table 2 on page 5 for more information

I really hope that more studies like this will be conducted on our COVID19 patients.

How are you preparing for COVID19 Rehab? Which set of data and recommendations are you using?

Happy learning and reading!

Farzad Refahi

May 31st, 2021

Dedication

This post is dedicated to my father. He was a kind hearted man who worked hard to have a humble and good life for the family. My father and mother have been a great role models for my brother and I. While he was taken away way too sudden and soon, I am blessed to have had him in my life.

Thanks for all you have done for me, dad.

With love,

Farzad